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Posts Tagged ‘race’

painted_man_first_day_school

Desmond Williams is a JUNO magazine columnist, freelance writer and dad living in Brooklyn, New York. He is currently putting the finishing touches on his book, The Painted Man: What My Young Son Taught Me About Race, a collection of coming of race memoirs that finds a dad confronted by racially charged questions posed directly by his young son and the people with whom they come into contact.

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Magnifying glass by Jen Chau, originally published at The Time Is Always Right

This is – I think – our favorite game to play when it comes to race. Locate the racist, focus on the racist, blog and tweet the crap out of that racist, and shame that racist as much as possible. The racist shouldn’t be able to carry on life as he knew it. I too hope for change in the person who took a misstep, but I think we are missing the bigger picture. We use magnifying glasses to focus on individual events rather than seeing the connections and the patterns that point to larger societal problems.

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The False Positive

graduateby Leotis Martin

Acquaintance: “So what are you doing in Florence?”

Me: “Spring vacation…I’m studying in Paris.”

A: “Oh, so where are you from in the States?”

Me: “Well, I’m originally from South America, but I grew up in the Bronx…”

A: “Oh, how is that?”

Me: “It’s the Bronx, so all the rumors you’ve heard are definitely true.”

A: “Hah. Well you made it to [insert private institution of higher learning here], right?  That means you had to be, like, extra super smart huh?” (more…)

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Making the 2010 Census Count

by Lynda Turet

The 2000 census marked an apparent victory for multiracial America. By gaining the ability to “check all that apply,” many gained legal recognition for racial identities which were formerly rendered invisible by rigid “check one only” rules.  Many in the multiracial community heralded the change as one of the few tangible advocacy gains of the emerging community’s efforts for recognition. The “check all that apply” rule allowed self-identifying mixed-race people the ability to count, and thus recognized as both ingredient and evidence of this complex and messy racial plutocracy we call America. (more…)

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fistWe’ve been running an experiment. What happens when you put five people in a room to read, learn, debate and struggle with how to translate our multiracial community into a catalyst for action? (I know what you’re thinking, and no, arm-wrestling was not involved). Five brave SwirlNYC members gave four afternoons of their lives (and then some) to collectively developing an analysis on race, justice, and what it means to do something about it. Led by Jen Chau (Founder and Executive Director of Swirl) and Lynda Turet (former Managing Director of Swirl), we piloted a semester of learning called “SwirlCamp,” meant to serve as a boot camp for Swirl members ready to take their involvement to the next level. Our sessions ran the gamut of exploring structural racism to discussing the impact (or lack thereof) of having a black and multiracial president. We also sharpened our leadership skills through self-reflection and skill-building. Our purpose was simple: how do we make our collective need for community into a tool to change what has impacted us all–racism? (more…)

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painted_man_parents_night_outDesmond Williams is a JUNO magazine columnist, freelance writer and dad living in Brooklyn, New York. He is currently putting the finishing touches on his book, The Painted Man: What My Young Son Taught Me About Race, a collection of coming of race memoirs that finds a dad confronted by racially charged questions posed directly by his young son and the people with whom they come into contact.

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Each year, Swirl partners with Loving Day to commemorate the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision legalizing inter-racial marriage in the United States.  This year, SwirlPhilly, Swirl’s newest chapter brought the Loving Day celebration to the City of Brotherly Love by hosting a viewing of the Franklin Institute’s RACE: Are We So Different? More than 25 mixed race individuals, couples, and families attended the inaugural event.

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