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Posts Tagged ‘identity’

Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, September 23, 2011: Naming Race: What others call us, what we call ourselves. If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Raza

Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro

by Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro

When I was eight years old
I was already astute
a smart worm
a perceptive cactus
who knew at that point
that during school recess (more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, September 9, 2011: How Being Mixed Has Shaped Me. If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, August 26, 2011: Interracial Relationships and “Dating While Mixed.” If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts!

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The Swirl team is happy to welcome its newest chapter on board – SwirlStarkville (in Mississippi)! And at its helm, Sheena Gardner (pictured at left).

The establishment of SwirlStarkville comes at a time when an increasing number of individuals are identifying as multiracial in a state which traditionally sees race in black and white. Because the chapter is located in a college town, the organization will focus primarily on serving the student population. (more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, August 12, 2011: How do you respond to the “What are you” question?

If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Originally published at Comp Lit and Mediaphilia

By Sarah Hannah Gómez

One of the reasons I hate the term “multicultural literature” (which generally means “children’s or YA lit with a protagonist of color, usually with a plot that deals centrally with issues of race or ethnicity) is because it leaves me without an appropriate label for a sub-genre (really a sub-sub-genre, because African American literature should be a sub-genre of fiction, not some other kind of lesser fiction) that I guess I’ll have to call biracial narrative literature. Lately I’ve been reading a lot of “African American literature,” especially books that deal more specifically with the biracial experience. That experience is utterly and totally different from the African American experience or the white experience, and it differs even more if you want to divide those narratives up by whether they deal with passing, with growing up in an African American community, or growing up in a white one. And that’s only three possibilities, just because I’m only talking about biracial people who are half black, half white. (more…)

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