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Archive for the ‘opinion’ Category

Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, September 23, 2011: Naming Race: What others call us, what we call ourselves. If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Originally published at El Alma Esta Escribiendo

by Francia Rocio Benson

Large clouds of smoke were darkening the sky and screams of pain, fear and helplessness were deafening the big apple. It was chaos:  Nobody knew what was happening. A cold intense fear spread across the city and on the faces of the people when they realized they were under attack; terrorists had infiltrated the country.  That heartbreaking tragedy had awakened the world on September 11, 2001. (more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, September 9, 2011: How Being Mixed Has Shaped Me. If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, August 26, 2011: Interracial Relationships and “Dating While Mixed.” If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts!

(more…)

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Here is the transcript from our TweetChat on Friday, August 12, 2011: How do you respond to the “What are you” question?

If you didn’t get to participate and want to weigh in on this topic now, please leave a comment and share your thoughts! (more…)

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Originally published at Comp Lit and Mediaphilia

By Sarah Hannah Gómez

One of the reasons I hate the term “multicultural literature” (which generally means “children’s or YA lit with a protagonist of color, usually with a plot that deals centrally with issues of race or ethnicity) is because it leaves me without an appropriate label for a sub-genre (really a sub-sub-genre, because African American literature should be a sub-genre of fiction, not some other kind of lesser fiction) that I guess I’ll have to call biracial narrative literature. Lately I’ve been reading a lot of “African American literature,” especially books that deal more specifically with the biracial experience. That experience is utterly and totally different from the African American experience or the white experience, and it differs even more if you want to divide those narratives up by whether they deal with passing, with growing up in an African American community, or growing up in a white one. And that’s only three possibilities, just because I’m only talking about biracial people who are half black, half white. (more…)

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by Ariel Joseph

“Return to Africa” they say. Proud of their heritage and sure of their connectedness to a continent and a peoples, an ocean and generations removed, they remain certain that they have a motherland, a place – perhaps the only place – on this lonely planet where they belong. (more…)

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by Christopher Bowers

In white, liberal culture people often think of themselves as “colorblind”, seeing only humans, not their race. It seems reasonable enough. We want to be humanists and believe that we see people for who they are inside, for what we have in common with them. It is important to ask, is what we feel inside really a commonality or could that also be as different as the color of our skin? (more…)

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Making the 2010 Census Count

by Lynda Turet

The 2000 census marked an apparent victory for multiracial America. By gaining the ability to “check all that apply,” many gained legal recognition for racial identities which were formerly rendered invisible by rigid “check one only” rules.  Many in the multiracial community heralded the change as one of the few tangible advocacy gains of the emerging community’s efforts for recognition. The “check all that apply” rule allowed self-identifying mixed-race people the ability to count, and thus recognized as both ingredient and evidence of this complex and messy racial plutocracy we call America. (more…)

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